Schedule

We are prepar­ing the 7th Inter­na­tional Push Hands Meet­ing 2018 in Prague for you.
Dates: 14th-16th Sep­tem­ber 2018


Schedule:

Fri­day   10:00–13:00
Work­shops:
14:30–16:30  
  Prac­tice in pairs  
 
Sat­ur­day   10:00–13:00
Work­shops:
15:00–18:00 19:30–22:00
  Prac­tice in pairs Gala-evening
 
Sun­day   10:00–13:00
Work­shops:
15:00–18:00  
  Prac­tice in pairs  
  • Work­shops – Expe­ri­enced teach­ers will present their meth­ods of work in Tai Chi Chuan and push hands.
  • Prac­tice in pairs – Par­tic­i­pants will indi­vid­u­al­ly agree on how they want to prac­tice in pairs. They will prac­tice in 10-minute rounds. Par­tic­i­pants will agree on the type of prac­tice (free push hands vs. form push hands, with steps vs. with­out steps). The lev­el is always adjust­ed to the prac­ti­tion­er with less expe­ri­ence.
  • Gala-evening – Space for pre­sen­ta­tions of styles, schools and forms as well as a friend­ly meet­ing.

Teachers


Nikolaus Deistler

Biog­ra­phy:

Niko­laus Deistler has been study­ing var­i­ous Far East­ern mar­tial arts since youth. His focus is on Tai­ji­quan by GM Huang Xing Xian as well as Tai­ji Tanglangquan (Pray­ing Man­tis style). His two main teach­ers are Mas­ter Lau Kung King (direct stu­dent of GM Huang) and Mas­ter Zhou Zhen­dong, the lin­eage hold­er in Tai­ji Tanglang in the ninth gen­er­a­tion. Niki Deistler suc­cess­ful­ly par­tic­i­pat­ed in sev­er­al Wushu Cham­pi­onships in Chi­na and also intro­duced some of his stu­dents for suc­cess­ful par­tic­i­pa­tion in the Aus­tri­an Wushu Cham­pi­onships. In 2006 he found­ed togeth­er with his wife, Yonghui D. Yi, TAIJIARTS – asso­ci­a­tion to pro­mote Chi­nese mar­tial arts and phi­los­o­phy. He reg­u­lar­ly spends a lot of time in Chi­na. Niki Deistler is teach­ing full-time in Vien­na. He is a teacher’s train­er of the IQTÖ (rep­re­sent­ing the inter­ests of Aus­tri­an Qigong, Yiquan and Tai­ji­quan teach­ers), as well as the lec­tur­er for Qigong on the Danube Uni­ver­si­ty Krems. His work includes var­i­ous projects on Tai­ji and coach­ing, as well as writ­ing var­i­ous tech­ni­cal arti­cles.

Top­ic:

To make the tran­si­tion from fixed pat­terns on the free Push­ing Hands as nat­ur­al as pos­si­ble, Lau Kung King devel­oped the so-called “Pat­tern of Hand – Con­nec­tions”. It con­cen­trates the most pow­er­ful and essen­tial ele­ments from the rich Tui Shou reper­toire with­in the tra­di­tion of GM Huang Xingx­i­an. First, it is like a fixed pat­tern and can then be prac­ticed more freely com­bined and car­ried out very flex­i­ble. For exam­ple, from bow stance into the par­al­lel stance, and final­ly into the bro­ken stance. Begin­ners have the secu­ri­ty, of work­ing with­in a fixed frame and being able to enjoy a cer­tain flow, while advanced peo­ple can improve their tim­ing and try to find the opti­mal “Point of Issue”. Because each Tui Shou is only as good as its back­ing, we engage in this work­shop on proven exer­cis­es of Huang School, such as “Tai­ji Bamen“ (8 basic forces), or ele­ments from the White Crane.

Link:

Tai­ji arts in Wien (Ger­man lan­guage)
 

Yonghui Deistler-Yi

Biog­ra­phy: 

Since her child­hood, Yonghui has been fas­ci­nat­ed by the Chi­nese mar­tial arts. She made her first con­tact with them at school. Her focus is Tai­ji­quan, but she also has knowl­edge in Fujian Bai He Quan (white crane style) and in Tanglangquan (Pray­ing Man­tis style) – the style of her home­town, Yan­tai. She learned from teach­ers as Lau Kung King, Yek Giong and Hao Cong. Since 2011 she has been the close stu­dent of Mas­ter Wang Lian Yu. In the weapon arts, her pri­or­i­ties are sword and fan. She learned Qigong with mas­ters such as Li Zhi Zhang, Zhang Guangde, Li Xiao­qiu, …
From 83 -90 she stud­ied at the Art School / School of Paint­ing and Applied Arts in Chi­na. In Vien­na, she grad­u­at­ed from the mas­ter class in oil paint­ing with Prof. Hut­ter and Hun­dert­wass­er at Vien­na (90−96). Since 1988 numer­ous pub­li­ca­tions in art mag­a­zines and peri­od­ic exhi­bi­tions in Chi­na and Aus­tria. Teach­ing at the Liao Ning art school in Chi­na, and direc­tor of numer­ous cours­es in Vien­na.
Employ­ment with new expres­sion meth­ods for tra­di­tion­al tech­niques of Chi­nese ink paint­ing and cal­lig­ra­phy. 2016 cal­en­dar design with Wang Ning for Tai­ji & Qigong Jour­nal, in coop­er­a­tion with Tai­ji Europe. Cur­rent­ly, Yonghui teach­es Tai­ji­quan, Qigong, weapons, and trad. Chi­nese paint­ing.

Top­ic:

Taijiquan – The interplay of structure and releasing

If Tai­ji­quan is bro­ken down into its com­po­nents, most­ly two things remain. Struc­ture and releas­ing (song), in both phys­i­cal and men­tal process­es. The body needs struc­ture, i.e. an erec­tion to be able to let coor­di­nat­ed move­ment arise. It will be prop­er­ly effec­tive only by releas­ing into these struc­tures. This cre­ates root­ed­ness and active com­pounds through which we can neu­tral­ize (Jin) and release forces.
Even men­tal­ly it needs a clear focus (Yi) to suc­cess­ful­ly car­ry out the respec­tive tasks. But if this too rigid, we lose our abil­i­ty to change. There­fore, it also needs on the men­tal plane, a release from the inten­tion. This cross­ing – over work­shop will be based on some solo – and part­ner exer­cis­es to illu­mi­nate this core issue. With these mech­a­nisms, we come to a bet­ter under­stand­ing of the basic forces and the var­i­ous pos­si­bil­i­ties of appli­ca­tion in Tai­ji­quan. The exer­cis­es can then be eas­i­ly inte­grat­ed into any train­ing sys­tem.

Link:

Tai­ji arts in Wien (Ger­man lan­guage)
 

Judith van Drooge

Biog­ra­phy:

Judith van Drooge has prac­tised Yang Lin­eage Tai Chi Chuan with Grand­mas­ter William C.C. Chen since 1999, with great plea­sure and devo­tion. She is an all-around prac­ti­tion­er who suc­cess­ful­ly com­pet­ed in nation­al and inter­na­tion­al tour­na­ments attain­ing gold, sil­ver and bronze medals in Forms (weapons), Chi Kung and Push Hands. Judith has her own school in Zwolle, the Nether­lands and has been a reg­u­lar teacher at most of the major Euro­pean Tai Chi events.

Top­ic:

Pushing Hands – Intuitive free movement.

Every­body has their own nat­ur­al respon­sive­ness. How do you react to a sit­u­a­tion, for exam­ple; pres­sure from out­side? Do you have access to your instinct or do you always use a fil­ter of think­ing so that emo­tions influ­ence your reac­tion? How do you reg­u­late these emo­tions? We are mir­rors for each oth­er and we can learn from each oth­er. We are going to test our ground­ing and inves­ti­gate the ben­e­fits of relax­ation, body pos­ture and breath­ing. The skin is the biggest organ we have with many func­tions, the touch of the skin gives you infor­ma­tion about the direc­tions of someone’s inten­tions. By prac­tis­ing push hands you learn to recog­nise and dis­ci­pline your feel­ings and respons­es accord­ing to them. Every action has a reac­tion. Yin and Yang. Your bat­tle with­in and with your sur­round­ing world.

Link:
Inner Touch Tai Chi Cen­trum in Zwolle (Dutch lan­guage)
 

Tomasz (Thomas) Nowakowski

Biog­ra­phy: Tomasz (Thomas) Nowakows­ki liv­ing in Lon­don, visu­al and mar­tial artist. He has stud­ied dif­fer­ent mar­tial arts since 1966 and has been teach­ing T’ai Chi Ch’uan and Qi Gong since 1982. Dur­ing last 30 years Thomas has taught Tai Chi Chuan and Qi Gong in many coun­tries: Aus­tria, Czech Repub­lic, France, Ger­many, Italy, Poland, Slo­va­kia, Tai­wan and Unit­ed King­dom. He has lead work­shops at his own school as well as for dif­fer­ent com­pa­nies, cul­tur­al and edu­ca­tion­al insti­tu­tions. Thomas was a judge at Open Nation­al Cham­pi­onship of Tai­wan in 2004. He is co-founder The Cen­tre of Taoist Arts Gold­en Hill (Zlaty Kopec) in Prague, Inter­na­tion­al Push Hands Meet­ing in Prague and founder Tai Chi Art Cen­tre Lon­don. In 1990 he met his cur­rent teacher Dr Ming Wong C.Y. and has stud­ied his fam­i­ly style Tai Chi, Tai Ki Kung San Fung and some tech­niques and the­o­ry of Chi­nese med­i­cine. Thomas is the author of “Shapes of Bal­ance” sys­tem (struc­tured devel­op­ment of per­cep­tion).

Top­ic:

When you under­stand a tech­nique, you know a tech­nique. When you under­stand a con­cept, you know a thou­sand of tech­niques.”
Under­stand­ing a con­cept is the core of my Shapes of Bal­ance teach­ing sys­tem.

The top­ic of my work­shop will be prac­ti­cal research a con­cept of Chang San Feng 13th Fun­da­men­tal Forms Tai Chi in indi­vid­ual forms and their appli­ca­tions with part­ner in Tuishou (Push­ing Hands). Based on the com­par­i­son exam­ples from San Feng and Yang styles. We will be work­ing with tim­ing, coor­di­na­tion, bal­ance of struc­ture and aware­ness of move­ments in action with part­ner.

Links:

 

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